More Interesting Dayton Facts

  • Susan Koerner Wright, mother of Wilbur and Orville, enjoyed making things for and with her children. Reportedly, her husband Milton could not hammer a nail straight, and she was the handy person in the family. She often made toys for the children, and even put together some small appliances to make her household chores easier.
  • In 1900, Dayton listed more inventions than any other city in the United States.
  • John Patterson could not stand Charles Kettering, and would often fire him from his company, NCR. Edward Deeds would always hire him back.
  • During rainy seasons, carriages would get stuck in the mud. To remedy this, huge logs were buried under the mud, lining Dayton streets in a “corduroy” fashion, preventing wagons and animals from sinking.
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Exercise Dayton – Riverscape Inventors Walk

Tired of the same exercise routine? Try visiting some of Dayton’s notable spots while you exercise!

Enjoy fresh air and history as you experience the Dayton Inventors River Walk.

The Route:

Starting with a brick medallion at the corner of Monument Avenue and Main Street, the Inventors Walk continues around Riverscape with informative tiles in the pavement, leading to the Automobile Self Starter, the first of 7 invention stations. Continue toward North Patterson Boulevard, visiting the Cash Register and Ice Cube sculptures. Cross the bridge on Patterson Boulevard to continue reading the tiles. Approximate distance is 1 mile (see map below).

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“Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of…

…a bike ride.” – John F. Kennedy

Just before the Wright Brothers opened their shop in the spring of 1893, George P. Huffman purchased the Davis Sewing Machine Company and moved the factory to Dayton. By 1892, the first Huffy bicycle was built. Years later in 1924, George’s son Horace founded the Huffman Manufacturing Company and continued to manufacture and sell bicycles under the now well-known name of Huffy.

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Prominent Local Figures: James Ritty

After opening his first saloon in Dayton, James “Jake” Ritty had a problem.

Jake’s employees were stealing, and he could not prove it. Stressed over the deficit in his profits, Jake decided to sail to Europe to get away for a while.

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Dayton Inventions – Part 3

  • Stepladder – John Balsley, 1862.
  • Ice Cream Cone Dispenser – Alexander McLaren, 1919.
  • Electric Furnace for cars – Charles L. Lee, 1923.
  • Air Conditioner (window/wall units) – Robert R. Candor, 1943.
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Dayton Inventions – Part 2

It’s that time again! Dayton is known for the airplane and the cash register, but there are so many more inventions that came from our great city:

  • Electric Cash Register – John H. Patterson, 1906.
  • Custer Invalid Chair – Levitt Luzern Custer, battery-powered in 1919, gasoline-powered in 1939.
  • Night Photography – Brigadier General George Goddard, 1926.
  • Freon Refrigerant – Thomas Midgley Jr., 1928.
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Dayton Inventions – Part 1

It is well-known that Dayton is a center for innovation. Here are a few examples of some inventions that have come from our great city:

  • Cash Register – James and John Ritty, 1870.
  • First Practical Airplane – Wright Brothers, 1903.
  • Automobile Self-starter: Charles F. Kettering, 1911.
  • Leaded Gasoline – Thomas Midgley Jr., 1921.
  • Mae West Life Preserver – Frank G. Manson, 1938.
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