One Missing Bench Found

As you may remember from the story of the Missing Benches, there has been a mystery surrounding the rest of the benches that are supposed to be located all around the Miami Valley.

Well, one of the benches has been located! Right in front of the Wright Brothers Airport in Springboro, with a lovely mural with the Wright Brothers in the background.

Found Bench

The remaining benches really are a mystery:

  1. Two at the National Museum of the US Air Force – Bethany spoke to the staff and volunteers (including a groundskeeper) at the museum, and nobody had any recollection of the benches.
  2. One somewhere at the Dayton International Airport

– no idea where!
Have you seen one of these benches at one of these two locations? We’re still hunting!

Wright Library Zine

Back in April we mentioned that to celebrate their 80th anniversary, Wright Library published an art and literary zine made up of poetry, short stories, essays, and art focusing on the Miami Valley, the Wright Brothers, and more.

We submitted written pieces to the zine and were both lucky enough to be selected for publication in the zine glide, which was published as both a hard copy and a digital copy. There were so many entries that an additional online zine, glide on was made available as well.

You can read our stories here:
The Man Who Sent Wilbur on the Wright Path by Sara Kaushal
The Missing Benches by Bethany Kmeid

While at the reception and open mic for the event, we had the honor of meeting Jeff Wilson, Author of Ohio Legends!

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Wright Library Literary Zine Reception

As we shared back in February, Wright Memorial Public Library turned 80 this year!

To celebrate, Wright Library decided to publish an art and literary zine made up of poetry, short stories, essays, and art focusing on the Miami Valley, the Wright Brothers, and more.

We both submitted written pieces to the zine, and we were both lucky enough to be selected for publication in the zine Glide and the online zine, Glide On! We will update with the link after the online zine is released!

There is a reception and open mic tonight from 7-8:30 at Wright Library to celebrate the release of the print and online zines! If you are interested in a copy of the print edition or want to join the festivities, please stop by!

Wright Memorial Public Library
1776 Far Hills Avenue
Oakwood, Ohio 45419

Also, next weekend is the Gem City Made craft show! We went last year and had a blast!

Where:
Beavercreek Nazarene Church
1850 N Fairfield Road
Beavercreek, OH 45432

When:
Saturday, May 4th, 2019 from 9am-3pm

We were on Gem City Tonight!

Our appearance on Gem City Tonight is now live! Thanks so much to Andrew Mitakides and Gem City Tonight for having us!

The line up for the episode was:

Dayton Unknown
And Lucky, Mr. Gay Ohio 2018

And always, the musical stylings of Aimee James and the Gems!

Check it out!

Dayton Sights: Wright Brothers Benches

It wasn’t luck that made them fly; it was hard work and common sense; they put their whole heart and soul and all their energy into an idea and they had the faith.” – John T. Daniels, who witnessed the first flights.

There are reportedly nine identical benches sculpted by David Evans Black, located all around the Dayton area. On the edge of the seat on the front, it reads, “Dedicated to the immortal spirit of Daytonians Orville and Wilbur Wright…” and continues on the back seat-edge with, “whose gift of powered flight lifted our world forever skyward.” The bench is designed to be reminiscent of the bench shown in the famous photograph of the Wright brothers’ first flight.

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More Interesting Dayton Facts

  • Susan Koerner Wright, mother of Wilbur and Orville, enjoyed making things for and with her children. Reportedly, her husband Milton could not hammer a nail straight, and she was the handy person in the family. She often made toys for the children, and even put together some small appliances to make her household chores easier.
  • In 1900, Dayton listed more inventions than any other city in the United States.
  • John Patterson could not stand Charles Kettering, and would often fire him from his company, NCR. Edward Deeds would always hire him back.
  • During rainy seasons, carriages would get stuck in the mud. To remedy this, huge logs were buried under the mud, lining Dayton streets in a “corduroy” fashion, preventing wagons and animals from sinking.
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Orville Wright (August 19, 1871 – January 30, 1948)

In honor of what would be Orville’s 146th birthday, here are some facts about the younger Wright Brother:

  • Orville was a snazzy dresser – Orville wore well-tailored suits, wingtips, and “snappy argyle socks.”
  • Orville loved playing the mandolin. In fact, he played it so often that it drove his sister Katherine to say, “He sits around and picks that thing until I can hardly stay in the house the point of madness.”
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Exercise Dayton – Riverscape Inventors Walk

Tired of the same exercise routine? Try visiting some of Dayton’s notable spots while you exercise!

Enjoy fresh air and history as you experience the Dayton Inventors River Walk.

The Route:

Starting with a brick medallion at the corner of Monument Avenue and Main Street, the Inventors Walk continues around Riverscape with informative tiles in the pavement, leading to the Automobile Self Starter, the first of 7 invention stations. Continue toward North Patterson Boulevard, visiting the Cash Register and Ice Cube sculptures. Cross the bridge on Patterson Boulevard to continue reading the tiles. Approximate distance is 1 mile (see map below).

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The Man Who Sent Wilbur on the Wright Path

If any fact is known about Dayton, it’s that Wilbur and Orville Wright created their heavier-than-air Flying Machine in Dayton, Ohio. What many don’t know, is that it almost didn’t happen.

Wilbur had set his sights on Yale. A star athlete in football, skating, and gymnastics, Wilbur intended to leave Dayton behind. It was the Winter of 1886 that changed the course of history for Wilbur and the future of flight.

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