The Isaac Pollack House

In 1854, two Jewish immigrants named Isaac Pollack and Solomon Rauh began a business partnership dealing whiskey and wine in Dayton from a warehouse on West Third Street.

Eight years later in 1862, Pollack served as a corporal in the civilian Squirrel Hunters during the Civil War and was regarded as a hero after the Squirrel Hunters successfully defended Cincinnati from an attack by the Confederate army. At the end of the war, Pollack and his friend Rauh started to build two identical homes on West Third Street.

Twin Houses

Source: Dayton International Peace Museum Website

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More Interesting Street Names

  • Wagner Ford Road – Named after the Wagoners, who owned the land where the road forded (was shallow enough to be crossed by wading) the Miami River. Over time, the spelling changed from Wagoner to Wagner.
  • Benn Street – named for M.S. Benn, a real estate dealer.
  • Siebenthaler Avenue – named for the well-known nursery family.
  • Stop Eight Road – The Dayton and Troy Railway had sixteen stops throughout its route. The eighth stop was at Henneke Road, and later renamed Stop Eight Road.
  • Wroe Avenue – named after Al Wroe, a Dayton contractor.
  • Diamond Mill Road – Named for a mill at the southern end of the road.
  • Iroquois Avenue, Wyandot Street, Bannock Street, Blackfoot Street, and Cherokee Drive – named after Native American tribes.
  • Michigan Avenue – the road ran alongside the Dayton & Michigan railroad.
  • Harman Avenue – named for Gabriel Harman, an owner of the Gebhart Harman Bank.
  • Arnold Place – Named for J.O. Arnold, long-time resident, historian and one of the planners of the Dayton View neighborhood.

Requarth Lumber Company

Bought lumber for making ribs and uprights from Requarth Co..” – Orville Wright in his journal, January 19, 1904

OW Requarth

Requarth Lumber was founded by Frederick August Requarth and Henry W. Meyer in 1860 as a small turning shop at Fourth Street and Wayne Avenue. They eventually moved to 447 East Monument Avenue in 1895, and have stayed there since.

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Wright Library Zine

Back in April we mentioned that to celebrate their 80th anniversary, Wright Library published an art and literary zine made up of poetry, short stories, essays, and art focusing on the Miami Valley, the Wright Brothers, and more.

We submitted written pieces to the zine and were both lucky enough to be selected for publication in the zine glide, which was published as both a hard copy and a digital copy. There were so many entries that an additional online zine, glide on was made available as well.

You can read our stories here:
The Man Who Sent Wilbur on the Wright Path by Sara Kaushal
The Missing Benches by Bethany Kmeid

While at the reception and open mic for the event, we had the honor of meeting Jeff Wilson, Author of Ohio Legends!

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Wright Library’s 80th Anniversary

On February 14th, 1939, Wright Memorial Library opened its doors in Oakwood. In 1913, the library started in the home of a local family and in 1916 a resolution was passed to establish a public library and the library’s location moved around a few times until a bond issue was passed to build a new building on Far Hills, on the site of the Katharine Wright Park.

On the opening night of February 14th, 1939, the lights went out, which required the crowd to tour their new library by candlelight. To celebrate 80 years of service to the community and commemorate the opening night, Wright Library held a candlelight celebration with historical items on display and a telling of the story of opening night.

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It’s Our 5th Anniversary!

On January 27th, 2014, Dayton Unknown shared our very first post.

Since then…

170 Posts
52,095 Views
750 Followers on WordPress
387 Posts on Instagram
2,414 Followers on Instagram
288 Likes on Facebook
So many wonderful people met.
And an unquantifiable amount of facts learned about Dayton.

Here are a few highlights of the past five years:

We are so excited to see what the future holds for us!

As always, if you have any story ideas or questions you’d like us to look into, please let us know! There are so many ways to contact us – leave a comment down below, via the Contact Us page, send an email (daytonunknown@hotmail.com), send a message on Facebook or Instagram (@daytonunknown), etc..

Some Interesting Street Names

  • Shoup Mill Road —Named for the mill on the Stillwater River
  • Claggett Drive, Neff Road, Ensley Avenue, and Drill Avenue – named for early settlers of Dayton
  • Bidleman Street — Short street named for Chas Bidleman, a Dayton dry goods merchant
  • Clay Street —named for Henry Clay, a former candidate for U.S. president
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Edwin C. Moses

Lots of people let it go by and never accomplish what they want. I just wanted to see what I could do.” – Edwin C. Moses

Edwin Corley Moses was born in 1955 in Dayton, Ohio. As the son of two educators, Edwin took academics seriously. In addition to being an excellent student, he was also a gifted athlete.

During high school, Edwin participated briefly in basketball and football, but soon turned to Track and Field. Edwin accepted an academic scholarship to Morehouse College, majoring in Physics and Industrial Engineering. Morehouse College did not have its own track, so Edwin practiced on nearby high school tracks. He competed mostly in 120-yard hurdles and the 440-yard dash. Edwin attributed his success at running to applying his knowledge of the mechanics of running and lots of stretching. He had a trademark technique, taking a consistent 13 steps between each hurdle instead of the usual 14, causing him to get ahead in the 2nd half of the race as his competitors changed their strides.

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Dayton Sights: Places of Worship

When I think of a place of worship, I think of a place where one can sit and be reminded of all the things that are important outside our individual lives. To express spirituality, the architect has to think of the original material of architecture, space and light.” – Richard Meier

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